single artist

Yana

“Yana […] slip ingeniously between improvised and composed passages, leaving the listener unsure which is which.” Wire Magazine, October/November 2015

“Over two improvised sets they sustained that beguiling sense of music that is being conjured before your eyes, and ears, that only the best group playing evokes – fans of the Wayne Shorter Quartet will know what I mean. And their attention to the smallest details can make you fall in love with sound all over again.” Bristol Jazz Log, December 2013

“They confound any preconceptions of what freely improvised music might sound like… Sometimes there was bit of an African lilt, at others a funky acoustic vibe, at still others swirling textures and moods and then a burst of racing swing.” Jazzy Blog Man, December 2013

“Combining high-wire spontaneity with deft composition, this is state-of-the-art improv from the new generation of UK jazz talent.” Time Out London, January 2009

“Their music featured climaxes and crescendos intricately weaved, leading the audience through the show by blending the quiet and peaceful with the loud and chaotic, whilst still retaining a level of order and cohesion that can only come from a strong artistic vision. […] this is definitely a band worth seeing.” FD2D Magazine, April 2012

“This group prioritises the practice of in-performance listening to create a tangible sense of synergy despite the absence of a preordained structure. The music was entirely improvised, born from the thoughts and feelings of the players at that precise moment in time… There was an undeniable sense of the sublime in this creation and experience. Though the music has not been named and the group has no recording the sensations visited on the audience will be carried for much time to come.” Vortex Jazz Club review by Joseph Kassman-Tod, January 2009

yana creates open, living music.

They got together in Stratford-upon-Avon on a dark and stormy night in November 2008, and from there have undertaken a Jazz Services national tour; performed at Manchester Jazz Festival; and supported jazz saxophone legend David Murray.

The music is a free-wheeling, spontaneous mixture of styles. This trio has developed a process entirely focussed on creating highly expressive live music that’s full of grooves and sounds composed, but is not; and playing compositions that don’t sound composed at all, but are.

How it all works is not always clear; but the process is always fascinating to hear, and the results can be truly moving.

Their newest studio recording is called don’t overthink it, which has garnered favourable attention in Jazzwise (4 stars), on All About Jazz and in a critics’ 2013 chart on The Wire’s website.

Dave Kane plays bass.

Dave Kane © Andy Newcombe

He’s released a critically-acclaimed album called Eye of the Duck on the Edition Records label; plays with pianist Matthew Bourne and Stephen Davis and has a fantastic duo with the trumpeter Alex Bonney which performed with Ken Vandermark in 2008. Dave is also founder of a creative musicians’ collective in Leeds called LIMA. There’s more info on Dave’s web-site.

In Daves words: “I believe music to be one of the most powerful and magical forms of communication and expression.  I am passionate about all forms of music making. If it makes a noise…. I’m into it!

Joshua Blackmore is on drums.

Joshua Blackmore © Andy Newcombe

He’s in the BBC Jazz Award-winning Curios trio with Tom Cawley and Sam Burgess, the mighty TROYKA with Kit Downes and Chris Montague, and has worked with Django Bates, Aloosh and the Floating Points Ensemble. Find out more on Joshua’s web-site.

Corey Mwamba plays the vibraphone.

Corey Mwamba © Andy Newcombe

As well as having made four electro-acoustic albums, Corey is on two albums made by Quantic, two by Nat Birchall, one by Arun Ghosh and one by Ty. He’s worked with lots of people including Mat Maneri and Lucian Ban, The Heliocentrics, Orphy Robinson, Robert Mitchell, Andy Hamilton, Scanner and Tony Kofi. More information is on Corey’s web-site.

In Corey’s words: “I fight aggressive mediocrity through music from the centre of a small island (but really, I am a musician, promoter, arts advocate, and researcher. I am from and live in Derby).

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